As Charles Muñoz says: "My picture doesn't look like me. My poems do."

After serving as a WWII aerial gunner, Muñoz next worked as a merchant-marine officer, contentedly sailing on freighters, tankers, and passenger ships until, the world being what it was, he was called upon to board munitions ships bound for duty in the wars in Korea and Vietnam. He then came ashore for good and married the former Bernardine Martin. He's a specialist in eighteenth-century literature, a novelist (his book Stowaway was published by Random House), and a poet (Poems from a Wet Basement and Fragments of a Myth: Modern Poems on Ancient Themes, published by Time Being Books, in 2001). For a while, he entertained himself as an explorer of caves, a walker in the desert, and a writer on arctic survival for the Air Force. He then chose a more formal profession, becoming vice president of Springhouse Corporation, a publisher of books and magazines.

This is the background that enriches his poems, which are often conventionally suburban in their location (he was poet laureate of Bucks County) but wildly mythic in their subtext. He was, for five years, poetry editor of Jewish Spectator magazine. His poems have earned four nominations for the Pushcart Prize.

 
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